A Seaside Mansion Finds a Second Life as a ‘Family Home’

Tray Ling

“I CALL THE house a kid magnet,” says Tiina Smith of the sprawling Tudor Revival in Marion, Mass., a small coastal town 60 miles south of Boston, that she shares with her husband, Larry Rand. “This is where my kids love to come. It’s where I get to spend time […]

“I CALL THE house a kid magnet,” says Tiina Smith of the sprawling Tudor Revival in Marion, Mass., a small coastal town 60 miles south of Boston, that she shares with her husband, Larry Rand. “This is where my kids love to come. It’s where I get to spend time with them.”

Located on 3.45 acres with nearly 300 feet of frontage on Sippican Harbor, the home, built as a summer estate in 1903, has a private stone pier for the family boats, a beach and a 75-foot-long heated swimming pool. Indoors, there is a commercial-style gym and 14 bedrooms. The stucco manse, says Ms. Smith, has been known for at least a century as the Anchorage for its linear proportion and red tile roof, landmarks that signal to boaters coming into the harbor from Buzzards Bay.

Establishing a home that was the heart of a family is what propelled Ms. Smith, 59, and her first husband to purchase the property in 1997, when their three children were small.

While the home needed work, there were abundant original details: The living and dining rooms had coffered ceilings and white wood-paneled walls. Glass doorknobs adorned the home’s dozens of original doors. Leaded stained-glass details were intact along with the mahogany billiard room’s elaborate wall carvings, and a hallway featured a curved plaster ceiling decorated with an array of intricate, three-dimensional flowers.

The house, according to Sippican Historical Society records, was designed by Boston architectural firm Coolidge and Carlson for Edward M. Clark and his family, and was considered among the grandest in Marion. It was later purchased by Richard Farnsworth Hoyt, a broker who, in the late 1920s, according to an article in the New York Times, used an amphibian plane with a Wright Cyclone engine and luxurious cabin accommodations to commute between the Anchorage to New York at 100 miles an hour.

Next Post

University unveils residential neighborhood breakdown, assignment process

The University has announced its plan for assigning neighborhoods and how residences will be divided in a Wednesday message to students. There will be a total of eight neighborhoods preliminarily named with letters: S, T, A, N, F, O, R and D. Students will be able to coordinate in groups […]